Wednesday, March 23, 2011

an easy type of self-facing straight neck


Thank you very much for your help, and for your response to the last blog post.

Please check what I wrote in it if you haven't read it, as there are still some days before the ruffle is closed. I am greatly thankful, not only for your donation, but also for all your kind attitude. It is helping us in every sort of ways to recover, I hope you understand what I mean. To know that we have your helping hands makes us positive and the situation inevitably better.

Today I'm going to share with you a tutorial post for making an easy straight neck T shirt. I prepared it some time ago, but I didn't think anyone would like it. I thought so because it was too simple to impress you sewing nerds. But I'm changing my mind. I think you might like it, for a change.
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how to alter a crew neck to an easy type of self-facing straight neck


I've been inspired by the construction of neckline of Wilma pullover and adopted it to the common T shirt. They use the extended bodice as a self-facing. This type of neckline doesn't require any binding finish, and thus it is technically very easy to make. I also found this straight neck T was more feminine than common crew neck Ts on me, which was a bonus. What we have to do for clean appearance is being careful to choose fabrics that don't roll up at edges too much, because the self-facing will not be sewn or fixed to the bodice.
neckline
You need to be ready with your own favorite pattern for common type of T shirt.

Cut bodices with the fabric on fold, but leave some of shoulder line and whole neck line uncut. Note that the neck opening will end much nearer to the front center than the point where cutting is stopped.
selffacingneck1
Flip the pattern horizontally on the fabric with the fulcrum at the neckline, and continue cutting like tracing the mirror image of bodice until reaches about 10cm/4in in length. This mirror image area will be a self-facing.
selffacingneck2
selffacingneck3
Overlock the straight edge of self-facing.
selffacingneck4
With the fabric right sides of the front and back piece facing, sew shoulder seams and clip the seam allowances towards the point of neck opening ends.
selffacingneck5
Open and press seam allowances, neaten self-facings before sleeves attached.
selffacingneck6
Attach sleeves, close side seams and finish as desired.
selffacingneck7
selffacingneck8
This neckline is least revealing and most unsensational, but I think the top looks feminine and lovely when on human.



You can't see it much in my pictures, though (sorry).


Love,
yoshimi

(P.S. Please accept my apology about the inappropriate word to describe you great people in this post.)

12 comments:

  1. I love boat necks so this tutorial is great for me. I now have an excuse to add another project to my long list. Thanks for sharing it

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  2. Lovely! I am always eager to see new necklines and how to do them, as I wear lots of knit tops and they can get so repetitive. I will definitely be keeping this one in mind :)

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  3. Beth (Sunnygalstudio)March 24, 2011 at 12:45 AM

    I like this shirt, will try it. thanks for the info. and I am proud to be a sewing nerd!

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  4. Hi Yoshimi,
    Thank you for posting this tutorial, I have never really thought about this straight style neck before but rather like it. It is very pretty and feminine - I would like to try it now!

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  5. I too love boat necks (what we call them here!) You are so inspiring me!

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  6. Hi Yoshima

    You are very talented. Your projects are a source of much inspiration to people like me who have never stitched a piece of clothing.
    Keep up the good work
    Jyoti

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  7. Thank you so much for posting this tutorial! It is very clear and useful. The sewing nerds are rejoicing!

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  8. You are absolutely wonderful, you know that?

    Thank you very much for the tutorial. I am definitely a sewing nerd who aspires to be a sewing geek so this is very much appreciated!

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  9. We would love more tutorials! Thanks for this one. I'm always sure you know so many techniques that we do not! Your work is lovely, and of course your shoes. . .

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  10. Thank you Yoshimi! This is my favorite neckline, but it is hard to find in stores. It also looks very cute with the scarf as you've shown in your photos. I will be using your tutorial!
    Jeanne

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  11. Youa re so funny. ;) Lovely shirt! It's so perfect.

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  12. Thank you! This is such a pretty shirt on you. I love this kind of neckline, but have yet to see a pattern with it. I want to make a dress with this now.

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Thank you for your comments!!